Artful Eye

Designers Anne-Marie Midy and Jorge Almada: The Casamidy style melding French and Mexican visions. 

Jorge Almada is totally separated from his family, isolated here at his home, Casa Midy, in San Miguel de Allende.

By Nancy North and Carol Troy

Casamidy, the furniture line he and his partner Anne-Marie Midy design, is crafted by artisans in San Miguel de Allende, in Mexico.

Ann-Marie Midy, and his two sons, are at their Brussels base, in Belgium.

Europe has closed flights due to Covid.

So Casamidy, their furniture line — her taste is for metal, his for leather — keeps him separated from his family. 

San Miguel de Allende sky — Image courtesy of casamidy

Almada’s family in Mexico goes back to 1729, when his Portuguese forebears landed in Sonora and started mining silver. During the Mexican revolution his great-grandfather, Plutarco Elias Calles, beat Pancho Villa to control the state…and later to become the president of Mexico.

The two first met in Boston 25 years ago when Midy was a student at the Rhode Island School of Design. She’d grown up in Paris, where her family owned a drug company. Aldama was a student of design at Parsons, in New York.

Image courtesy of casamidy

After a time in New York, the couple moved to Mexico City. In this romantic time, Aldama and Midy took to the road in their VW, hitting villages in Michoacan, Guerrero and Oaxaca, tracking down hidden artisans whom they commissioned to create special things for them. Mexican tradition mixed with a clean European eye: ceramic shapes, copper chargers, market bags with metallic colors.

The couple moved to the colonial city of San Miguel de Allende on the high plains of Mexico and opened a short-lived tapas bar, Plum. An American visitor, taken with their style, asked them to put together his vacation house.

That San Miguel visitor changed the course of their lives. With nothing to be found in local stores in the late 1990s, Midy discovered a love for the basics she found in hardware stores, and was especially taken with a quarter-gauge iron. 

The classic chair she designed — the Opera Chair — was crafted and produced by the master ironsmith who, luckily, was their next door neighbor. It is still one of Casa Midy’s favorite creations. Image from Facebook
Wrought iron and saddle leather — they make for elegant yet simple designs that age brilliantly, picking up the patina of the bohemian life here in San Miguel. Image from Facebook

In their last book from Rizzoli, The Artisanal Home, Jorge Aldama and Anne-Marie Midy show how they use patinated artisanal objects and family heirlooms to create comfortable yet dramatic surroundings. 

Opera chairs. Image taken from casamidy website

Midy’s opera-chair styles are covered in remnants from a luxurious Paris textile house, and terra cotta tiles are reminiscent of summer places in St. Jean Cap Ferrat. For each project, they explain their design process, the textures used and the color palette.

Where to see it: Contact the very private Casamidy collection through their website:

www.casamidy.com

Artful Eye

Designers Anne-Marie Midy and Jorge Almada: The Casamidy style melding French and Mexican visions. 

Jorge Almada is totally separated from his family, isolated here at his home, Casa Midy, in San Miguel de Allende.

By Nancy North and Carol Troy

Casamidy, the furniture line he and his partner Anne-Marie Midy design, is crafted by artisans in San Miguel de Allende, in Mexico.

Ann-Marie Midy, and his two sons, are at their Brussels base, in Belgium.

Europe has closed flights due to Covid.

So Casamidy, their furniture line — her taste is for metal, his for leather — keeps him separated from his family. 

San Miguel de Allende sky — Image courtesy of casamidy

Almada’s family in Mexico goes back to 1729, when his Portuguese forebears landed in Sonora and started mining silver. During the Mexican revolution his great-grandfather, Plutarco Elias Calles, beat Pancho Villa to control the state…and later to become the president of Mexico.

The two first met in Boston 25 years ago when Midy was a student at the Rhode Island School of Design. She’d grown up in Paris, where her family owned a drug company. Aldama was a student of design at Parsons, in New York.

Image courtesy of casamidy

After a time in New York, the couple moved to Mexico City. In this romantic time, Aldama and Midy took to the road in their VW, hitting villages in Michoacan, Guerrero and Oaxaca, tracking down hidden artisans whom they commissioned to create special things for them. Mexican tradition mixed with a clean European eye: ceramic shapes, copper chargers, market bags with metallic colors.

The couple moved to the colonial city of San Miguel de Allende on the high plains of Mexico and opened a short-lived tapas bar, Plum. An American visitor, taken with their style, asked them to put together his vacation house.

That San Miguel visitor changed the course of their lives. With nothing to be found in local stores in the late 1990s, Midy discovered a love for the basics she found in hardware stores, and was especially taken with a quarter-gauge iron. 

The classic chair she designed — the Opera Chair — was crafted and produced by the master ironsmith who, luckily, was their next door neighbor. It is still one of Casa Midy’s favorite creations. Image from Facebook
Wrought iron and saddle leather — they make for elegant yet simple designs that age brilliantly, picking up the patina of the bohemian life here in San Miguel. Image from Facebook

In their last book from Rizzoli, The Artisanal Home, Jorge Aldama and Anne-Marie Midy show how they use patinated artisanal objects and family heirlooms to create comfortable yet dramatic surroundings. 

Opera chairs. Image taken from casamidy website

Midy’s opera-chair styles are covered in remnants from a luxurious Paris textile house, and terra cotta tiles are reminiscent of summer places in St. Jean Cap Ferrat. For each project, they explain their design process, the textures used and the color palette.

Where to see it: Contact the very private Casamidy collection through their website:

www.casamidy.com

Artful Eye

Designers Anne-Marie Midy and Jorge Almada: The Casamidy style melding French and Mexican visions. 

Jorge Almada is totally separated from his family, isolated here at his home, Casa Midy, in San Miguel de Allende.

By Nancy North and Carol Troy

Casamidy, the furniture line he and his partner Anne-Marie Midy design, is crafted by artisans in San Miguel de Allende, in Mexico.

Ann-Marie Midy, and his two sons, are at their Brussels base, in Belgium.

Europe has closed flights due to Covid.

So Casamidy, their furniture line — her taste is for metal, his for leather — keeps him separated from his family. 

San Miguel de Allende sky — Image courtesy of casamidy

Almada’s family in Mexico goes back to 1729, when his Portuguese forebears landed in Sonora and started mining silver. During the Mexican revolution his great-grandfather, Plutarco Elias Calles, beat Pancho Villa to control the state…and later to become the president of Mexico.

The two first met in Boston 25 years ago when Midy was a student at the Rhode Island School of Design. She’d grown up in Paris, where her family owned a drug company. Aldama was a student of design at Parsons, in New York.

Image courtesy of casamidy

After a time in New York, the couple moved to Mexico City. In this romantic time, Aldama and Midy took to the road in their VW, hitting villages in Michoacan, Guerrero and Oaxaca, tracking down hidden artisans whom they commissioned to create special things for them. Mexican tradition mixed with a clean European eye: ceramic shapes, copper chargers, market bags with metallic colors.

The couple moved to the colonial city of San Miguel de Allende on the high plains of Mexico and opened a short-lived tapas bar, Plum. An American visitor, taken with their style, asked them to put together his vacation house.

That San Miguel visitor changed the course of their lives. With nothing to be found in local stores in the late 1990s, Midy discovered a love for the basics she found in hardware stores, and was especially taken with a quarter-gauge iron. 

The classic chair she designed — the Opera Chair — was crafted and produced by the master ironsmith who, luckily, was their next door neighbor. It is still one of Casa Midy’s favorite creations. Image from Facebook
Wrought iron and saddle leather — they make for elegant yet simple designs that age brilliantly, picking up the patina of the bohemian life here in San Miguel. Image from Facebook

In their last book from Rizzoli, The Artisanal Home, Jorge Aldama and Anne-Marie Midy show how they use patinated artisanal objects and family heirlooms to create comfortable yet dramatic surroundings. 

Opera chairs. Image taken from casamidy website

Midy’s opera-chair styles are covered in remnants from a luxurious Paris textile house, and terra cotta tiles are reminiscent of summer places in St. Jean Cap Ferrat. For each project, they explain their design process, the textures used and the color palette.

Where to see it: Contact the very private Casamidy collection through their website:

www.casamidy.com

Artful Eye

Designers Anne-Marie Midy and Jorge Almada: The Casamidy style melding French and Mexican visions. 

Jorge Almada is totally separated from his family, isolated here at his home, Casa Midy, in San Miguel de Allende.

By Nancy North and Carol Troy

Casamidy, the furniture line he and his partner Anne-Marie Midy design, is crafted by artisans in San Miguel de Allende, in Mexico.

Ann-Marie Midy, and his two sons, are at their Brussels base, in Belgium.

Europe has closed flights due to Covid.

So Casamidy, their furniture line — her taste is for metal, his for leather — keeps him separated from his family. 

San Miguel de Allende sky — Image courtesy of casamidy

Almada’s family in Mexico goes back to 1729, when his Portuguese forebears landed in Sonora and started mining silver. During the Mexican revolution his great-grandfather, Plutarco Elias Calles, beat Pancho Villa to control the state…and later to become the president of Mexico.

The two first met in Boston 25 years ago when Midy was a student at the Rhode Island School of Design. She’d grown up in Paris, where her family owned a drug company. Aldama was a student of design at Parsons, in New York.

Image courtesy of casamidy

After a time in New York, the couple moved to Mexico City. In this romantic time, Aldama and Midy took to the road in their VW, hitting villages in Michoacan, Guerrero and Oaxaca, tracking down hidden artisans whom they commissioned to create special things for them. Mexican tradition mixed with a clean European eye: ceramic shapes, copper chargers, market bags with metallic colors.

The couple moved to the colonial city of San Miguel de Allende on the high plains of Mexico and opened a short-lived tapas bar, Plum. An American visitor, taken with their style, asked them to put together his vacation house.

That San Miguel visitor changed the course of their lives. With nothing to be found in local stores in the late 1990s, Midy discovered a love for the basics she found in hardware stores, and was especially taken with a quarter-gauge iron. 

The classic chair she designed — the Opera Chair — was crafted and produced by the master ironsmith who, luckily, was their next door neighbor. It is still one of Casa Midy’s favorite creations. Image from Facebook
Wrought iron and saddle leather — they make for elegant yet simple designs that age brilliantly, picking up the patina of the bohemian life here in San Miguel. Image from Facebook

In their last book from Rizzoli, The Artisanal Home, Jorge Aldama and Anne-Marie Midy show how they use patinated artisanal objects and family heirlooms to create comfortable yet dramatic surroundings. 

Opera chairs. Image taken from casamidy website

Midy’s opera-chair styles are covered in remnants from a luxurious Paris textile house, and terra cotta tiles are reminiscent of summer places in St. Jean Cap Ferrat. For each project, they explain their design process, the textures used and the color palette.

Where to see it: Contact the very private Casamidy collection through their website:

www.casamidy.com

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Artful Eye

Designers Anne-Marie Midy and Jorge Almada: The Casamidy style melding French and Mexican visions. 

Jorge Almada is totally separated from his family, isolated here at his home, Casa Midy, in San Miguel de Allende.

By Nancy North and Carol Troy

Casamidy, the furniture line he and his partner Anne-Marie Midy design, is crafted by artisans in San Miguel de Allende, in Mexico.

Ann-Marie Midy, and his two sons, are at their Brussels base, in Belgium.

Europe has closed flights due to Covid.

So Casamidy, their furniture line — her taste is for metal, his for leather — keeps him separated from his family. 

San Miguel de Allende sky — Image courtesy of casamidy

Almada’s family in Mexico goes back to 1729, when his Portuguese forebears landed in Sonora and started mining silver. During the Mexican revolution his great-grandfather, Plutarco Elias Calles, beat Pancho Villa to control the state…and later to become the president of Mexico.

The two first met in Boston 25 years ago when Midy was a student at the Rhode Island School of Design. She’d grown up in Paris, where her family owned a drug company. Aldama was a student of design at Parsons, in New York.

Image courtesy of casamidy

After a time in New York, the couple moved to Mexico City. In this romantic time, Aldama and Midy took to the road in their VW, hitting villages in Michoacan, Guerrero and Oaxaca, tracking down hidden artisans whom they commissioned to create special things for them. Mexican tradition mixed with a clean European eye: ceramic shapes, copper chargers, market bags with metallic colors.

The couple moved to the colonial city of San Miguel de Allende on the high plains of Mexico and opened a short-lived tapas bar, Plum. An American visitor, taken with their style, asked them to put together his vacation house.

That San Miguel visitor changed the course of their lives. With nothing to be found in local stores in the late 1990s, Midy discovered a love for the basics she found in hardware stores, and was especially taken with a quarter-gauge iron. 

The classic chair she designed — the Opera Chair — was crafted and produced by the master ironsmith who, luckily, was their next door neighbor. It is still one of Casa Midy’s favorite creations. Image from Facebook
Wrought iron and saddle leather — they make for elegant yet simple designs that age brilliantly, picking up the patina of the bohemian life here in San Miguel. Image from Facebook

In their last book from Rizzoli, The Artisanal Home, Jorge Aldama and Anne-Marie Midy show how they use patinated artisanal objects and family heirlooms to create comfortable yet dramatic surroundings. 

Opera chairs. Image taken from casamidy website

Midy’s opera-chair styles are covered in remnants from a luxurious Paris textile house, and terra cotta tiles are reminiscent of summer places in St. Jean Cap Ferrat. For each project, they explain their design process, the textures used and the color palette.

Where to see it: Contact the very private Casamidy collection through their website:

www.casamidy.com

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